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Frontiers of Environmental Economics

Resources for the Future, with the support of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's National Center for Environmental Economics, convenes a conference in Washington, DC to explore the frontiers of environmental economics.

In February 2006, RFF opened an international competition through a call for paper proposals from environmental economists, other economists, and academics of any other discipline who could offer research papers at the frontiers of environmental economics and contribute to identifying or resolving important public policy problems addressed within the sub-discipline of environmental economics. A program committee consisting of Joseph Aldy, RFF; Catherine Kling, Iowa State University; Alan Krupnick, RFF; John List, University of Chicago; former RFF President Paul Portney, University of Arizona Eller College of Management; and V. Kerry Smith, Arizona State University evaluated more than 175 submissions. The committee selected nine papers for the conference and organized a closing panel of distinguished scholars to identify research questions on the frontiers of environmental economics.

These papers advance theoretical and empirical methods in environmental and resource economics and illustrate how expanding the research frontier can inform the design and evaluation of environmental policy in the future. Some of the papers address the implications of neuroeconomics, behavioral economics, experimental economics and virtual reality for environmental economics. Other papers explore the consequences of adding more sophisticated representations of space and time to models of natural resource growth and use, such as fisheries. Many of these papers involve multiple disciplines; for instance, one involves economists, historians and paleo-ecologists to examine the effects of agriculture on biodiversity over a 400 year period.

Provocative and intense discussions and a packed room testify to the interest shown in these papers. Next steps include revising the papers and publishing them as RFF Discussion Papers. Updates will be made to this page as they become available.

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Jump to Welcome and Introduction
Jump to Paper 1 panel
Jump to Paper 2 panel
Jump to Paper 3 panel
Jump to Paper 4 panel
Jump to Paper 5 panel
Jump to Paper 6 panel
Jump to Paper 7 panel
Jump to Paper 8 panel
Jump to Paper 9 panel
Jump to Closing Panel

 

Welcome and Introduction:

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Phil Sharp

Paul Portney

Alan Krupnick

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  • Listen to all introductory remarks: Link to Audio

 

Biographies:

Phil Sharp, President, Resources for the Future

Phil Sharp is president of RFF. His career in public service over the last 35 years includes 10 terms as a member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Indiana and a lengthy tenure on the faculty of the John F. Kennedy School of Government and the Institute of Politics (IOP) at Harvard University. He served as director of the IOP from 1995 to 1998 and again from 2004 until August 2005. Sharp is co-chair of the Energy Board of the Keystone Center and a member of the National Research Council's Board of Energy and Environmental Systems. He serves on the Boards of Directors of the Energy Foundation, the Cinergy Corporation, and the Electric Power Research Institute. He received his Ph.D. in government from Georgetown University.

Paul Portney, Dean, Eller College of Management,
University of Arizona

Paul R. Portney is dean of the Eller College of Management. From 1972 through 2005, he was with RFF. From 1986 to 1989 he headed two of its research divisions, in 1989 became its vice president, and was named president and CEO in 1995. From 1979 to 1980, He served as chief economist for the White House Council on Environmental Quality. He has held visiting teaching positions at the University of California at Berkeley and Princeton University. He is the author or co-author of 10 books, including Public Policies for Environmental Protection, and was recently named one of the 100 most-cited researchers in economics and business. Portney received his Ph.D. in economics from Northwestern University and his B.A. from Alma College.

Alan Krupnick, Senior Fellow, Resources for the Future

Alan Krupnick is a senior fellow and director of the Quality of the Environment division at RFF. He works extensively on valuing benefits of environmental policies. He has studied the value that New York residents place on ecological benefits in the Adirondacks, the valuation of children's health in the context of lead abatement in U.S. homes, and the willingness of Canadians to pay for improvements in the quality of their drinking water. Krupnick also conducts significant research in China, tracking the health effects of Taiyuan's sulfur dioxide permit trading program and examining whether emissions reductions are leading to measurable health improvements. He also has conducted surveys worldwide that elicit willingness to pay for mortality risk reductions. Krupnick received a Ph.D. and an M.A. in economics from the University of Maryland and a B.S. in finance from Pennsylvania State University.

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Paper 1: Using Biomedical technologies to inform economic modeling: Challenges an opportunities for improving analysis of environmental policies

   
  • Brian Roe
  • Timothy Haab



 

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Conference Presentation:

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Brian Roe

Trudy Ann Cameron

Q & A

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Biographies:
Brian Roe, Author, Ohio State University

Brian Roe is an associate professor in the Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics at Ohio State University. Prior to his employment at Ohio State, Roe worked on food safety and health information disclosure policy issues as a staff fellow at the FDA. His research focuses on issues ranging from information disclosure policies to livestock economics to behavioral contracting. His most recent work employs a mix of behavioral and biomedical methodologies to explore the heterogeneity and stability of individual response to economic risk. He holds a Ph.D. in agricultural and resource economics from the University of Maryland and a bachelor's degree from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

Timothy Haab, Author, Ohio State University

Tim Haab is a professor in the Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics at Ohio State University, where his research and teaching focuses on environmental economics, experimental economics, and applied econometrics. Recent research has looked at the impacts of social norms on common-pool resource management, measurement of individual discount rates for environmental projects, the consistent modeling of individual welfare across value elicitation methods, and the stability of individual preferences in the presence of external stimuli. Haab is a graduate of Agricultural and Resource Economics Department at the University of Maryland. He joined Ohio State University in 2000 after five years on faculty at East Carolina University

Trudy Ann Cameron, Discussant, University of Oregon

Trudy Ann Cameron is the Raymond F. Mikesell Professor of Environmental and Resource Economics at the University of Oregon. She has served in multiple capacities on the Science Advisory Board of EPA.  Cameron is the current president of AERE and has served as a member of the association's Board of Directors and as vice president. She has been an associate editor of the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management and the American Journal of Agricultural Economics.  Prior to joining the University of Oregon faculty in 2001, she was a professor of economics at UCLA. She has research interests in the valuation of non-market goods - in particular, the empirical measurement of the social benefits of environmental policies, including individuals' willingness to pay to reduce environmental risks to human life and health. She received a Ph.D. in economics from Princeton.

John List, Chair, University of Chicago

John List is a professor of economics at the University of Chicago. His research focuses on such topics as discrimination in markets, market institutions, charitable giving, the environment and ways in which people determine value. List is best known for pioneering the use of field experiments in economics. His work has stimulated a new area of study that explores economic behavior in naturally occurring environments with controlled experimental methods. List is an RFF university fellow and received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wyoming.

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Paper 2: What drives long-term biodiversity change? New insight from combining economic, paleo-ecology, and environmental history

  • Nicholas Hanley
  • Konstantinos Angelopoulos
  • Dugald Tinch
  • Althea Davis
  • Fiona Watson
  • Edward Barbier

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Conference Presentation:

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Nicholas Hanley

Spencer Banzhaf

 

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Biographies:
Nicholas Hanley, Author, University of Stirling

Nick Hanley is professor of environmental economics at the University of Stirling, Scotland. Prior to taking up this appointment, he was professor of natural resource economics at the University of Edinburgh and professor of economics at the University of Glasgow. At Stirling, he heads the Environmental Economics Research Group. Most of Hanley's work is the area of environmental cost-benefit analysis, but he also works on diffuse pollution, tradable permit markets, sustainable development indicators, and CGE modeling. He is a member of the Department of Environment's Academic Advisory Panel and the author of three textbooks in environmental economics.

Spencer Banzhaf, Discussant, Georgia State University

Spencer Banzhaf is an associate professor of economics in the Department of Economics, Georgia State University. His work focuses on the interactions among local environmental amenities, local real estate markets, and demographic composition and structure of cities. He applies these and other tools of benefit-cost analysis to the evaluation and design of environmental policy and to the creation of "green" index numbers and accounts. He also studies the history of welfare economics. Prior to joining Georgia State in the fall of 2006, he was a fellow at RFF. He received a Ph.D. and B.A. in economics from Duke University.

Alan Krupnick, Chair, Resources for the Future

Alan Krupnick is a senior fellow and director of the Quality of the Environment division at RFF. He works extensively on valuing benefits of environmental policies. He has studied the value that New York residents place on ecological benefits in the Adirondacks, the valuation of children's health in the context of lead abatement in U.S. homes, and the willingness of Canadians to pay for improvements in the quality of their drinking water. Krupnick also conducts significant research in China, tracking the health effects of Taiyuan's sulfur dioxide permit trading program and examining whether emissions reductions are leading to measurable health improvements. He also has conducted surveys worldwide that elicit willingness to pay for mortality risk reductions. Krupnick received a Ph.D. and an M.A. in economics from the University of Maryland and a B.S. in finance from Pennsylvania State University.

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Paper 3: Virtual experiments and environmental policy

  • Stephen Fiore
  • Glenn Harrison
  • Charles Hughes
  • E. Elisabeth Rutström

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Conference Presentation:

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Glenn Harrison

Paul Portney
Comments by John Graham

Q & A

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*This video section is part of Glen Harrison's presentation
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Biographies:

Glenn Harrison, Author, University of Central Florida

Glenn Harrison is a professor of economics at the University of Central Florida. His research interests include experimental economics, law and economics, international trade policy, and environmental policy. His work in experimental economics has included the study of bidding behavior in auctions, market contestability and regulation, bargaining behavior, and the elicitation of risk and time preferences. His work in environmental economics has included modeling the effects of alternative policies to mitigate global warming, critiquing casual applications of the contingent valuation method, and improving methods of damage assessment. He received a Ph.D. in economics from UCLA. He is a Pisces and loves red wine and one Swedish woman.

John Graham, Discussant, RAND Graduate School

John Graham is dean of the Frederick Pardee RAND Graduate School at the RAND Corporation in Santa Monica, California. He also holds a chair in Policy Analysis, which supports his research activities. Graham joined the Harvard School of Public Health as a post-doctoral fellow in 1983 and became an assistant professor in 1985. From 1990 to 2001, Graham founded and led the Harvard Center for Risk Analysis. In 1995, Graham was elected president of the Society for Risk Analysis. He is a former administrator for the Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs in the Office of Management and Budget. Graham earned a Ph.D. at Carnegie-Mellon University, an M.A. in public policy at Duke University, and a B.A. in politics and economics at Wake Forest University.

Paul Portney, Chair, University of Arizona

Paul R. Portney is dean of the Eller College of Management. From 1972 through 2005, he was with RFF. From 1986 to 1989 he headed two of its research divisions, in 1989 became its vice president, and was named president and CEO in 1995. From 1979 to 1980, He served as chief economist for the White House Council on Environmental Quality. He has held visiting teaching positions at the University of California at Berkeley and Princeton University. He is the author or co-author of 10 books, including Public Policies for Environmental Protection, and was recently named one of the 100 most-cited researchers in economics and business. Portney received his Ph.D. in economics from Northwestern University and his B.A. from Alma College.

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Paper 4:  The economics of spatial-dynamic processes: applications to renewable resources

  • Martin Smith
  • James Sanchirico
  • James Wilen

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Conference Presentation:

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Martin Smith

Steve Polasky

Q and A

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Biographies:
Martin Smith, Author, Duke University

Martin Smith is an assistant professor of environmental economics in the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences and in the Duke economics department. He studies marine resources, including fisheries, marine ecosystems, and beaches. His research combines micro-econometrics with bioeconomic modeling to analyze fisheries management. His work has appeared in the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Land Economics, Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Natural Resource Modeling, and Canadian Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences. He is an associate editor for Marine Resource Economics and a member of the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management' editorial council.
James Sanchirico, Author, Resources for the Future

Jim Sanchirico is a senior fellow at RFF. His research focuses on the economic analysis of managing living biological resources, such as fisheries, biodiversity, and invasive species, with an emphasis on marine issues. His studies range from investigation of the effects of closing off areas of the ocean to commercial fishing to the design, implementation, and performance of market-based instruments, such as individual fishing quotas. Other research investigates how to design markets for the provision of ecosystem services and goods and how to manage and control invasive cheatgrass in the Great Basin of the United States. He is a past associate editor of Marine Resource Economics. He received a Ph.D. in agricultural and resource economics from University of California, Davis, and a B.A. from Boston University.

Stephen Polasky, Discussant, University of Minnesota

Stephen Polasky, an RFF university fellow, holds the Fesler-Lampert Chair in Ecological/Environmental Economics at the University of Minnesota. He has served as a senior economist for the President's Council of Economic Advisers and is serving on EPA's Science Advisory Board. He was associate editor and co-editor for the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management. His research focuses on biodiversity conservation, endangered species policy, integrating ecological and economic analysis, ecosystem services, renewable energy, and common-property resources and has appeared in Ecological Applications, Journal of Economics Perspectives, Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, International Economic Review, Land Economics, Nature, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Science, and other journals. He received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan.

Alan Krupnick, Chair, Resources for the Future

Alan Krupnick is a senior fellow and director of the Quality of the Environment division at RFF. He works extensively on valuing benefits of environmental policies. He has studied the value that New York residents place on ecological benefits in the Adirondacks, the valuation of children's health in the context of lead abatement in U.S. homes, and the willingness of Canadians to pay for improvements in the quality of their drinking water. Krupnick also conducts significant research in China, tracking the health effects of Taiyuan's sulfur dioxide permit trading program and examining whether emissions reductions are leading to measurable health improvements. He also has conducted surveys worldwide that elicit willingness to pay for mortality risk reductions. Krupnick received a Ph.D. and an M.A. in economics from the University of Maryland and a B.S. in finance from Pennsylvania State University.

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Paper 5: A dynamic model of household location, regional growth and endogenous natural amenities with cross-scale interactions

  • Elena Irwin
  • Ciriyam Jayaprakash
  • Yong Chen

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Conference Presentation:

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Elena Irwin

Amy Ando

Q and A

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  • Watch, or listen to, the entire panel: Link to Video Link to Audio
Biographies:
Elena Irwin, Author, Ohio State University

 

Elena Irwin is an associate professor in the Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics at Ohio State University. Her research interests include spatial models of urbanization and land-use change and dynamic models of human-environment interactions. She is the co-director of the Exurban Change Project at Ohio State and co-leader of the university's Biocomplexity Project on coupled natural-human interactions in large lake ecosystems, which is supported by NSF. She received a Ph.D. in agricultural and resource economics from the University of Maryland and a B.A. from Washington University in St. Louis.

Ciriyam Jayaprakash, Author, Ohio State University

Ciriyam Jayaprakash is a professor in the Department of Physics at Ohio State University. His research interests include quantum many-body systems, statistical mechanics, and nonlinear dynamics. He is currently working on modeling the initial response of the immune system to viruses and also on coupled natural-human interactions in large lake ecosystems. He was a Sloan Fellow and is a fellow of the American Physical Society. He received Ph.D. from the University of Illinois, an M.S. from the California Institute of Technology, and his undergraduate degree from the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpu.

Yong Chen, Author, Ohio State University

Yong Chen is a fourth-year graduate student in the Department of Agricultural, Environmental, and Development Economics at Ohio State University. His primary research interest is in computational economics with applications to macroeconomics and environmental economics. He has an M.A. in economics from Peking University, China and a B.A. in English from Beijing Foreign Studies University.

Amy Ando, Discussant, University of Illinois

Amy Whritenour Ando is an associate professor in the Department of Agricultural and Consumer Economics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She spent three years as a fellow at RFF before moving to Illinois in 1999. She works on problems of species and land conservation, with publications in outlets such as Science, the Journal of Law and Economics, and the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management. She has also conducted research on the enforcement of natural resource damage liability statutes and the determinants of household recycling behavior. She serves on the editorial boards of three journals, including the American Journal of Agricultural Economics. She earned her Ph.D. in economics from MIT and her B.A. from Williams College.

Joseph Aldy, Chair, Resources for the Future

Joe Aldy is a fellow at RFF. His research focuses on climate change policy, mortality risk valuation, and energy policy, and has been published in the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Land Economics, Energy Journal, and Environmental and Resource Economics. From 1997 to 2000, Aldy served on the staff of the President's Council of Economic Advisers, where he was responsible for climate change policy and other environmental issues. He holds a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University, a Master of Environmental Management from the Nicholas School of the Environment and Earth Sciences, and a B.A. from Duke.

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Paper 6: Non-price Equilibria for Non-Marketed Goods

  • Daniel Phaneuf
  • Jared Carbone
  • Joseph Herriges

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Daniel Phaneuf

Jared Carbone

Christopher Timmins

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Q and A

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Biographies:
Daniel Phaneuf, Author, North Carolina State University

Dan Phaneuf is an associate professor of agricultural and resource economics at North Carolina State University and the director of NCSU's Center for Environmental and Resource Economics and Policy. His research and teaching interests include non-market valuation and applied econometrics, with applications to recreation demand and water-quality valuation and has been published in the journals Review of Economics and Statistics, Journal of Business and Economic Statistics, and Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, among others. He is also a contributor to the Handbook of Environmental Economics and other collected volumes. Phaneuf is currently serving as a co-editor for the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management and previously sat on the journal's editorial council. He received his Ph.D. in economics from Iowa State University and his undergraduate degree from Saint John's University.

Jared Carbone, Author, Williams College

Jared Carbone is an assistant professor of economics at Williams College. His research is focused on evaluating large-scale environmental and public policy issues including climate change impacts and mitigation strategies, natural disaster response, and pollution policies with important general equilibrium consequences. His work has appeared in journals such as Environmental and Resource Economics, the Journal of Health Economics, and the Journal of Risk and Uncertainty. He received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Colorado at Boulder and a B.A. in math/economics from Wesleyan University.

Joseph Herriges, Author, Iowa State University

Joe Herriges is professor of economics at Iowa State University. Prior to joining the Iowa State faculty in 1988, he was a senior economist at the economic consulting firm Laurits R. Christensen Associates. His research and teaching interests have focused on applied econometrics, non-market valuation, and incentive mechanism design in both electric power and pollution control. His research has been published in the Review of Economics and Statistics, Journal of Econometrics, Rand Journal, Journal of Business and Economic Statistics, and Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, and others. He was the managing editor of the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management from 2001 to 2006. He received his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wisconsin - Madison and his undergraduate degree from Marquette University.

Christopher Timmins, Discussant, Duke University

Christopher Timmins is an associate professor of economics at Duke University. He joined the Duke faculty in 2004 after spending seven years on the faculty at Yale University. His research focuses on environmental and development economics, including the role of equilibrium models of sorting behavior in describing preferences for non-marketed environmental commodities; the role of idiosyncratic labor market returns in measuring the value of a statistical life; and identifying agglomeration and congestion effects in models of recreation demand, urban development, and spatial models of entry by large retailers. He received his Ph.D. from Stanford University.

Alan Krupnick, Chair, Resources for the Future

Alan Krupnick is a senior fellow and director of the Quality of the Environment division at RFF. He works extensively on valuing benefits of environmental policies. He has studied the value that New York residents place on ecological benefits in the Adirondacks, the valuation of children's health in the context of lead abatement in U.S. homes, and the willingness of Canadians to pay for improvements in the quality of their drinking water. Krupnick also conducts significant research in China, tracking the health effects of Taiyuan's sulfur dioxide permit trading program and examining whether emissions reductions are leading to measurable health improvements. He also has conducted surveys worldwide that elicit willingness to pay for mortality risk reductions. Krupnick received a Ph.D. and an M.A. in economics from the University of Maryland and a B.S. in finance from Pennsylvania State University.

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Paper 7:  Cost-benefit analysis as market simulation: a new approach to the problem of anomalies in environmental evaluation

  • Robert Sugden

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Conference Presentation:

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Robert Sugden

V. Kerry Smith

Michael Hanemann

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Q and A

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  • Watch, or listen to, the entire panel: Link to Video Link to Audio
Biographies:
Robert Sugden, Author, University of East Anglia

 

Robert Sugden is a professor of economics at the University of East Anglia. His research uses theoretical, experimental, and philosophical methods to investigate issues in welfare economics, choice under uncertainty, the elicitation of preferences, pro-social behavior, the emergence of conventions and norms, economic methodology, and philosophical economics. He holds a research fellowship from the United Kingdom Economic and Social Research Council for work on reconciling behavioral and normative economics.

Michael Hanemann, Discussant, University of California

Berkeley Michael Hanemann is Chancellor's Professor, Department of Agriculture and Resource Economics, University of California, Berkeley, where he directs the California Climate Change Center. His research interests include non-market valuation, environmental economics and policy, water pricing and management, demand modeling for market research and policy design, the economics of irreversibility and adaptive management, and welfare economics. Hanemann is a member of the Science Advisory Board to the EPA and an RFF university fellow. He received a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University.

V. Kerry Smith, Chair, Arizona State University

V. Kerry Smith is the W.P. Carey Professor of Economics at Arizona State University and a RFF university fellow. He has held chaired professorships at North Carolina State University, Duke University, and Vanderbilt University. He is a member of NAS and a fellow in AERE and the American Agricultural Economics Association. His research has focused on the measurement of the economic values for non-market environmental amenities and their use in benefit-cost analysis. A past president of AERE and the Southern Economics Association, he has served on EPA's Science Advisory Board and has been active in other areas of professional service. His research has been published in the American Economic Review, Journal of Political Economy, Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, and Review of Economics and Statistics, and other journals. Currently he writes a continuing column for AERE's new journal the Review of Environmental Economics and Policy.

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Paper 8: Toward choice-theoretic foundations for behavioral welfare economics

  • Douglas Bernheim
  • Antonio Rangel

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Conference Presentation:

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Antonio Rangel 

Charles Mason

Q and A

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Biographies:
Antonio Rangel, Author, California Institute of Technology

Antonio Rangel is an associate professor of economics with tenure at the California Institute of Technology. His research interests include neuroeconomics and behavioral public economics, with a focus on the use of FMRI and eye-tracking to study the neural basis of simple economic choices, the development of computational models of how the brain makes simple choices, and the development of choice theoretic foundations for welfare economics when decision makers can make mistakes. He received a Ph.D. and M.A. from Harvard University and a B.A. from the California Institute of Technology.

Charles Mason, Discussant, University of Wyoming

Charles Mason is a professor of economics at the University of Wyoming. His research has addressed such topics as the exploration for and extraction of non-renewable resources and management of common-property resources, particularly those that are renewable. He has also applied experimental economics techniques to theoretical issues in industrial organization. Mason is currently the managing editor of the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management. He received his Ph.D. in economics and his B.A. in economics and mathematics from the University of California at Berkeley. He is a Pisces and loves red wine and one Californian woman.
John List, Chair, University of Chicago

John List is a professor of economics at the University of Chicago. His research focuses on such topics as discrimination in markets, market institutions, charitable giving, the environment and ways in which people determine value. List is best known for pioneering the use of field experiments in economics. His work has stimulated a new area of study that explores economic behavior in naturally occurring environments with controlled experimental methods. List is an RFF university fellow and received a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Wyoming.

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Paper 9: Quasi-experimental and experimental approaches to environmental economics

  • Michael Greenstone
  • Ted Gayer

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Conference Presentation:

 

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Michael Greenstone

V. Kerry Smith

Q and A 

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  • Watch, or listen to, the entire panel: Link to Video  Link to Audio
Biographies:
Michael Greenstone, Author, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Michael Greenstone is the 3M Professor of Economics in the Department of Economics at MIT and is a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research is focused on estimating the costs and benefits of environmental quality. He has worked extensively on the Clean Air Act and examined its impacts on air quality, manufacturing activity, housing prices, and infant mortality. He is currently engaged in a large-scale project to estimate the economic costs of climate change. He is a member of the EPA's Science Advisory Board. In 2004, Greenstone received the 12th Annual Kenneth J. Arrow Award for Best Paper in the Field of Health Economics. He received a Ph.D. in economics from Princeton University and a B.A. from Swarthmore College.
V. Kerry Smith, Discussant, Arizona State University

V. Kerry Smith is the W.P. Carey Professor of Economics at Arizona State University and a RFF university fellow. He has held chaired professorships at North Carolina State University, Duke University, and Vanderbilt University. He is a member of NAS and a fellow in AERE and the American Agricultural Economics Association. His research has focused on the measurement of the economic values for non-market environmental amenities and their use in benefit-cost analysis. A past president of AERE and the Southern Economics Association, he has served on EPA's Science Advisory Board and has been active in other areas of professional service. His research has been published in the American Economic Review, Journal of Political Economy, Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, and Review of Economics and Statistics, and other journals. Currently he writes a continuing column for AERE's new journal the Review of Environmental Economics and Policy.

Catherine Kling, Chair, Iowa State University

Catherine Kling is a professor of economics at Iowa State University and head of the Resource and Environmental Policy Division of the Center for Agricultural and Rural Development. Prior to her Iowa State appointment, she was an associate and assistant professor in the Department of Agricultural Economics at the University of California, Davis. She is a fellow of the American Agricultural Economics Association and has served as a member of their Board of Directors and Awards Committee chair. She has also served as vice president and member of the Board of AERE and has held editorial positions at several environmental and agricultural economics journals. Kling's research addresses methods for improving non-market valuation methods and economic incentives for pollution control, especially in relation to non-point source pollution from agriculture. Kling holds a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Maryland and a B.A. in business and economics from the University of Iowa.

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Closing Panel: The Frontiers of Environmental Economics   

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V. Kerry Smith

Dennis Epple

Simon Levin

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  • Questions and Answers, chaired by V. Kerry Smith Link to Video
  • Listen to all remarks by the closing panel: Link to Audio

 

Biographies:

Dennis Epple, Panelist, Carnegie Mellon University

Dennis Epple is Thomas Lord Professor of Economics at Carnegie Mellon University. His recent research has focused on the political economy of state and local governments, household lifecycle location choices, and the economics of education. His work has appeared in leading economic journals, including the American Economic Review, Econometrica, Journal of Political Economy, and Journal of Public Economics. He is a fellow of the Econometric Society and a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research. A co-editor of the Journal of Public Economics and former co-editor of the American Economic Review, he also serves on the boards of several other journals. He received a Ph.D. in economics, an M.S. in economics, and an M.P.A. from Princeton University and a B.S. in aeronautical engineering from Purdue University.

Simon Levin, Panelist, Princeton University

Simon A. Levin is Moffett Professor of Biology at Princeton and director of the university's Center for BioComplexity. His principal research interests are in understanding how macroscopic patterns and processes are maintained at the level of ecosystems and the biosphere, in terms of ecological and evolutionary mechanisms that operate primarily at the level of organisms, and in the interface between ecology and economics. Levin was the former chair of the Board of the Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, president of the Ecological Society of America, and president of the Society for Mathematical Biology. He currently is chair of the Council of IIASA, and co-chair of the Science Board of the Santa Fe Institute. He is a member of NAS and the American Philosophical Society and a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Levin received the MacArthur Award and Distinguished Service Award from the Ecological Society of America, the Okubo Prize from the Society for Mathematical Biology and the Japanese Society for Theoretical Biology, the 2004 Heineken Prize for Environmental Sciences from the Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the 2005 Kyoto Prize for Basic Sciences. He received a Ph.D. in mathematics from the University of Maryland and a B.A. in mathematics from The Johns Hopkins University.

V. Kerry Smith, Chair, Arizona State University

V. Kerry Smith is the W.P. Carey Professor of Economics at Arizona State University and a RFF university fellow. He has held chaired professorships at North Carolina State University, Duke University, and Vanderbilt University. He is a member of NAS and a fellow in AERE and the American Agricultural Economics Association. His research has focused on the measurement of the economic values for non-market environmental amenities and their use in benefit-cost analysis. A past president of AERE and the Southern Economics Association, he has served on EPA's Science Advisory Board and has been active in other areas of professional service. His research has been published in the American Economic Review, Journal of Political Economy, Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, and Review of Economics and Statistics, and other journals. Currently he writes a continuing column for AERE's new journal the Review of Environmental Economics and Policy.

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